Richard Walker’s Pancake House

La Jolla, California

Architect: Mark Bausback, AIA

Pacific Sunrise at the Main Entrance Transoms
24.8' w. by 2.3' h.

It's The Walker Rabbit (Again)! at the Community Table
6.25' w. by 6.3' h.

There He Goes! at the Main Dining/Kitchen Screen
14.0' w. by 3.0' h.

Lazy D Transoms at the Atrium
2 @ 7.1' w. by 1.6' h.


This newest addition to the Richard Walker’s Pancake House family is in La Jolla. A 25 foot wide series of transom windows span the Main Entrance and begin the stained glass experience with a dazzling Pacific Sunrise. Once inside, the (in)famous Walker Rabbit wastes no time jumping into action from the window presiding over the Community Table.

The elusive trademark hare eventually makes his escape out through the suspended stained glass screen that separates the main dinning room from the kitchen – the screen allows diners to watch the preparation of their tasty meals. Stained glass also inhabits the Lazy D Transom Windows overlooking al fresco dining in the atrium.

A Little Background: This La Jolla location joins a 3-generation progression of award-winning pancake restaurants from Illinois to California. The stained glass tradition began at Walker-family restaurants in the Chicago area in 1960 when Richard Walker, Sr.’s father and uncle filled their first Pancake House with antique stained glass. In the mid 1990s, Architectural Stained Glass created stained glass for Richard Walker’s second Pancake House in Crystal Lake (near Chicago). Fast-forward to this century when ASG was called on to create stained glass for a new Richard Walker’s Pancake House in the Gas Lamp District of San Diego. Check out the stained glass at the San Diego Richard Walker’s Pancake House. More recently and featured here is the newest Richard Walker’s opened in La Jolla, California by son Richard, Jr.

For websites and menus of individual restaurants: San DiegoLa JollaCrystal Lake.


Materials: European Mouthblown Glass, Austrian Lead Crystal Prisms, Lead, Solder